LATEST ARTICLES

SignatureForgery

You think that you bought a famous painting, but did you really? Art forgers dupe unsuspecting buyers (whether they’re individual collectors or museums) into shelling out big bucks for fakes. Art forgeries don’t just fool unsuspecting buyers who are art novices. Take a look at some of these infamous forgeries and who paid the price! Famous people buy fakes too. Actor Steve Martin bought what he thought was a painting by German Expressionist artist Heinrich Campendonk in 2004. The painting was not in fact by Campendonk, but instead part of one of the biggest scams that the German art world has seen. With more than 30 fake works ‘sold’ to multiple buyers, the forgery ring was responsible for an estimated $49 million in total losses. Museums get caught in art scams too! Infamous art forger Mark Landis ‘donated’ fakes to roughly 60 American museums over the course of three decades. The subject of the 2014 documentary “Art and Craft,” Landis (a schizophrenic) still continues to make his fakes. Forgery isn’t exactly new. Michelangelo might have achieved fame for his own masterful work, but he also passed off his own ‘antiqued’ sculptures as real Roman art. ‘The Internet has become an ideal place for...
Cezanne - Uferlandschaft

Millions of dollars of art goes missing more often than you might think. Whether it’s stolen from a major museum, gallery or a private collector’s home, these well-known works have become the subject of art sleuthing the world over. What are some of the most notable stolen artworks that are yet to be recovered? The FBI maintains a top 10 art crimes list that includes: Caravaggio, Nativity with San Lorenzo and San Francesco. Stolen in October 1969 from Palermo, Italy. According to the FBI, this painting is worth roughly $20 million. Cezanne, View of Auvers-sur-Oise. This landscape was stolen on New Year’s Eve 1999. During the holiday fireworks celebration, an art thief broke into the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford, England and took this notable Cezanne work. Renoir, Madeleine Leaning on Her Elbow with Flowers in Her Hair. In 2011 this painting was stolen by armed thieves from a private collector’s home in Houston. The FBI notes that a private insurer is offering up to $50,000 for credible information that leads to the recovery of this stolen masterpiece. Van Gogh, View of the Sea at Scheveningen. Two thieves stole two the artist’s works in December 2002 from the Vincent Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam....

The Impressionist Claude Monet’s painting “Bassin aux nympheas, les rosiers” sold recently for a lofty $20.4 million. Wang Jianlin, Asia’s richest man, bought the artwork at Sotheby’s May 5 Impressionist and Modern Art sale. Bought by the collector’s Dalian Wanda Group, the Chinese company has been buying Western artworks recently. In the past few years the Dalian Wanda Group has bought other notable works, such as Pablo Picasso’s “Claude et Paloma.” With an auction total of $368.3 million, Asian collectors contributed to more than 30 percent of the sales. The auction was the second-highest sale for Sotheby’s, taking next-to-best after the 2014 New York $422.1 million sale. Private collectors from Asia bought three out of the auction’s top five lots. Each of the top sales was over $20 million. “Bassin aux nympheas, les rosiers” wasn’t the only Monet to sell at the evening’s auction. The lots also included four other works by the artist; bringing in a total of $115.4 million. This includes a $54 million sale to an American collector. This makes the to-date total for Monet’s in 2015 $199.2 million, already topping last year’s sales total for the impressionist artist of $190.5 million. The auction high for the night was...
Loving Vincent

A biopic on Vincent Van Gogh in animation? The feature film Loving Vincent is under production at London’s Three Mills Studios. Unlike other animated features, this artful film is literally a painted portrait. Thirty painters are set to create 56,800 works in oil, depicting the live-action film footage. The film investigates the life and death of Van Gogh, tackling the mystery-fraught narrative through the artist’s paintings and via ‘interviews’ with a cast of characters close to the artist. Drawing from more than 800 letters that Van Gogh wrote, the film revolves around the events leading to his death. Along with the letters, the film is based on (and features) more than 120 of Van Gogh’s most notable works. Among the unique facets of this film is the use of oil paintings (instead of computer-generated images) as frames. With the innovative imagery that technology provides for, this film goes beyond a throw-back to hand-drawn animation and moves into a hand-painted form. BreakThru Productions (Peter and the Wolf) helps to bring this film to life, using Painting Animation Work Stations (or PAWS). Patented by BreakThru, PAWS allows the film’s artists to created hand-painted frames in the style of Van Gogh himself. With space...
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Don McLean wrote the song Vincent (Starry, Starry Night) many years after Van Gogh's tragic death, but a closer look to the lyrics reveal how deep McLean's words dive into Vincent Van Gogh's life-story. As if McLean was able to tap into the tormented soul of the artist in those horrifying moments. Here is a comparison between the lyrics of the song Vincent and Vincent Van Gogh's Actual Life: Expressing Van Gogh's ability to sit and be immersed in nature as some of the other Impressionist of the time is somewhat misleading."Look out on a summer's day." Many of Van Gogh's famous works were painted when he was in an asylum at Saint-Remy, so most of his work were done from memory. Starry, starry night. Paint your palette blue and grey, Look out on a summer's day, With eyes that know the darkness in my soul. Shadows on the hills, Sketch the trees and the daffodils, Catch the breeze and the winter chills, In colors on the snowy linen land. These are references to some of the more famous Van Gogh paintings: Flaming Flowers: The Sunflower Series Swirling Clouds: Starry Night Field of Amber Grain: Wheat Field with Crows Weathered Faces: The Potato Eaters. Starry, starry night. Flaming flowers...
Sherlock Holmes of the Art World

Art detectives aren't fictional characters that Hollywood movie writers make up. Real-life detective, Christopher Marinello seeks out and recovers stolen art on a truly grand scale. Marinello, born and raised in Brooklyn New York, started his career as a lawyer, specializing in art title disputes. He now travels the world, recovering millions of dollars’ worth of stolen art. As the founder of London-based Art Recovery International, Marinello has solved art mysteries and recovered works by some of history’s most notable artists. Along with modern-day art heists, he has found and brought back stolen World War II era works, taken by the Nazis. How does Marinello solve these art mysteries? In some cases, tips help him to track down the missing works. In 2014 Marinello received a tip from a source calling himself ‘Darko’. The tip claimed that a Los Angeles art thief had stolen works by artists such as Diego Rivera and Mark Chagall. The LA police and FBI used the tip to jump-start an undercover sting. The result? Nine artworks with a total value of $10 million were recovered. Marinello doesn't just solve the most current art crimes. He recovered a Braque almost four decades after its original theft. Some of...
Top 10 Mother’s Day Paintings for 2015

overstockArt.com, the online art gallery of hand painted art, revealed today their Top 10 Mother’s Day Art list for 2015. Based on a detailed inbound traffic analysis, the site has ranked the top art choices for moms in 2015: Le tre eta della donna (Mother and Child), Gustav Klimt. Influenced by the avant-garde movement of his time, Klimt’s sensitive portray of a mother and child is tender, yet rich with design and imagery. The gentle scene depicts a young child drifting off to sleep on his mother’s shoulder. Sweet, serene and symbolic, this masterful work represents the deep love that only a mother and child can share. Madame Monet and Her Son, Claude Monet. Originally painted in 1875, Monet captures the gentle breeze and lux light in his Impressionist style brushstrokes. Unlike the traditional portraiture of the time, Monet turned his back on convention and created figures in much the same style as his landscapes. Featuring portraits of the artist’s wife and son, this work is a bright, sunny Mother’s Day treat. Mother and Child, Lord Frederic Leighton. The 1865 painting features a loving mother-daughter scene. With a love of classical and biblical themes, Leighton’s art features a realistic style that is...
DANCING IN RED by Anthony Dunphy

A native of Newfoundland, Anthony Dunphy has a Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Education from Memorial University in Canada. Dunphy was born in Carbonear, grew up in the capital city of St. John’s and resides in Japan. Making the city of Numazu home, Dunphy now lives in Shizuoka prefecture at the base of Mount Fuji. Inspired by his father to become an artist, Dunphy has been working as a professional painter since 2006. Along with his father (who carved in soapstone, sketched, drew and used mixed media -- but never showed his art publicly), Dunphy also gained inspiration from the nostalgic Norman Rockwell covers of the Saturday Evening Post. Dunphy primarily paints in professional grade acrylics. This provides him with the perfect vehicle to create his vividly-hued works. He also occasionally uses graphite to create drawings. His art was first shown in the Grand Hall at Grand Central Station in New York City. Following this, Dunphy was featured in exhibitions at Toyota Motors Corporation as well as at local Japanese events. The artist captures seemingly everyday moments in light-drenched hues, bringing the images off of the canvas with pops of bold colors. His “Telling Sea Stories” depicts a seashore scene, showing...

Taking the train to Giverny, home of Claude Monet, just became even more fun. The SNCF rail network recently launched the “Impressionist train.” This upgrade to the traditional train cars makes the rail ride into Normandy a true artistic experience. Visiting the famous home of one of (if not the) most notable Impressionist artists is less than an hour trip from Paris by train. The newest edition to the Rouen line features an art theme that adds to the overall experience. Before ever stepping foot on the historic ground where Monet once painted masterworks such as Water Lilies, visitors are treated to a preview of what's to come. Previously, the railway network offered dressed-up service to Versailles. Instead of the typical neutral train décor, the Versailles carriers feature pictures of the famed chateau. The Giverny rail will be SNCF’s summer-time venture into the art world. The car interiors feature reproductions of some of Monet's most famous works, along with the art of his fellow Impressionist painters. Themes for the cars include local landscapes, gardens and water and Paris and industrialism. Additional photos from the Musee d’Orsay’s architecture also adorn the insides of the train cars. Upon arrival at Vernon, riders will...
Riviere - Una and the Lion

Add a creative, whimsical touch to your home décor with animal-themed art. Does this mean that you should hang up your old velour tiger black light painting from college? Of course not. Instead, check out some of these world class artworks that feature creatures big and small. Accent a neutral décor or create a flowing theme that feeds into the animal-inspired works. These pieces bring light, color and texture to your walls, while drawing visual interest. If you’re not completely re-designing your room, adding animal art pieces can transform the space without having to do a total renovation. Elegant animal art comes in many forms. If you’re not sure where to start, consider some of these key pieces: Una and the Lion, Briton Riviere. The depiction of the classic tale by the British-born Riviere can add warmth to almost any room in your home. The light-drenched lamb and lion, along with Una herself, evoke a regal tone that could easily accent a formal dining or living room space. This painting also picks up on the gold tones that are gaining popularity in design and décor. Askeladdens Adventure, Theodor Severin Kittelsen. The Norwegian artist’s nature-themed paintings are well-known the world over. This work,...