Authors Posts by Crystal Spear

Crystal Spear

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I was raised in Wichita, KS and I have been drawing and painting as long as I can remember. I paint the interior of my house according to the season and could not imagine a world without colors. I am a writer, mother, and grandmother - My motto in life has always been "Any day you wake up is going to be a good day".
Rothko - White and Black in Blue

The word "modern" is defined "pertaining to present or recent times".  But what happens when Modern Art is no longer “present” or “recent”? To label the current period of art as Modern Art you should look to the forms and appearances of our modern realm and what art means to artist and the audiences in present time. Modern Art should be and is viewed as a swift and drastic art style with countless deviations. A different attitude towards art is arising from technology and society’s view of what is even considered art. In times past, artists were hired by only the wealthy and it was used as more of a status symbol by most. Now, art is art. It is acceptable to use art to express ourselves and show our inner feelings. What once might have been considered Abstract or Cubism is now being called Modern.  Artists are constantly looking for ways to provide an escape from reality. Abstract, Modern, Pop Art are all nothing new to the art world of course, but it has become more accepted in today's world.
Dali - The Meditative Rose

The world around us is constructed in math, but have you ever felt that math slip away. That everything was not as it seemed. That people were watching people who watched people. Welcome to the world of Salvador Dali, one of the most psychological pronounced painter in his artwork which depicted surrealism and the painting of all things. The art of Surrealism takes place in a dream world, and the painting of this was the surrealism movement, Salvador Dali was its leader. His art was said to be directly influenced by the Renaissance leaders themselves. Dali was born on May 7, 1904 in the town of Figueres, Spain. Known for his “everything excessive, luxury and love of oriental clothes” style and his self-proclaimed “Arab lineage.” At a very young age, 5, Dali was taken to his brother’s grave and told that he was his older brothers reincarnation who had died nine months before Dali's birth. Salvador Dali can be found everywhere, his most prized art is kept original by the museums in Spain. Dali's real name is Salvador Domingo Felipe Jacinto Dalí i Domènech. Dali's sister had published a novel in 1949. His sister was three years younger than he was, and...
Tim Burton's Art influenced by Great Maters

Tim Burton has broken down barriers when it comes to creativity. His unique characters and settings have created a whirlwind of emotions in viewers of all ages. Burton’s work will be featured in Paris thanks to the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) at the Cinémathèque Française where all can see how his work has evolved over the years and see into Burton’s twisted mind. The show will feature over 700 pieces of Burton’s work including the beginning drawings of now famous characters and will be on exhibit until Sunday, August 5th. Burton grew up in a suburban home in California, and from the time he was a young child he has always been interested in things that were a little abnormal. While other children were out playing, Burton was busy drawing robots and long-toothed monsters. Thanks to Burton’s ingenious mind, we now have well-known characters such as Jack Skellington, Sweeney Todd, Edward Scissor Hands, and many more unique and twisted individuals. Inspiration came to Burton through a few different outlets. Some of his influences include Vincent Price, Edgar Allen Poe, and Walt Disney. Each of these influences used different Medias and methods, but still played a big part into how Burton...
Louvre Paris France

In the U.S., summer vacation travelers hit the road with kids in tow, driving locally in search of the perfect day trip or longer distances to take in what the country has to offer. For more adventurous souls, families will board flights and take to the skies, travelling domestically or internationally. As art lovers, we love combining our vacation time with a chance to step into a local art museum and take a glimpse into a famous masterpiece. If you intend on going beyond the borders of the U.S., don't miss the opportunity to visit a world-class museum in route. Here is a short list of countries and places any art lover should take the time and visit. France: The best time to visit France is during the summer months. From Paris to Brittany, from Provence to the French Riviera, there is something for everyone in France. Several museums call France home, most especially The Louvre in Paris. It’s one of the world’s largest museums and the most visited art museum in the world with hundreds of the greatest masterpieces exhibited. One of the world’s most famous, Leonardo da Vinci’s Mona Lisa, is perhaps the highlight of the museum visit. Also at the...

The color blocking craze dominated runways last year, spilling over into 2012 and taking center stage in fashion, furniture and flower designs in the Spring. Color Blacking is virtually everywhere this Summer! Bright colors bordering on neon are all the rage in fashion and in furniture, with softer shades of color blocks dominating weddings, as well as other home accents and décor. Why the focus?  For some in the fashion and furniture world, it harkens back to the 50s and 60s, with a decidedly “mod” focus.  But even then, like so many fashion trends, designers drew inspiration from art.  For example, in 1965, French fashion designer Yves Saint Laurent was influenced by artist Piet Mondrian’s color block paintings. Mondrian’s Composition With Red, Blue and Yellow was the inspiration’s for Laurent’s famously unique wool jersey color block dress. Dresses, handbags, shoes, jackets are all getting the color block treatment, along with a DIY component. Because of the dominance of tangerine as color of the year, blocking uses shades of orange as the driving base, stacked with neutrals and creams primarily, but also along with other “hot” shades (pinks and reds). For home furnishings, color blocking is rampant in shelving and bookcases, with...

On June 5th, an event occurred that won't happen again for more than a century – 105 years, to be exact! If you were lucky enough to have witnessed it... congratulations! For those who did not, you may be wondering what "it" was. What was the event? The transit of the planet Venus across the face of the Sun. This celestial spectacle is so rare, that schools, museums and astronomy clubs had Venus viewing parties!  It all began late Tuesday afternoon in the Western Hemisphere (Wednesday morning in the Eastern Hemisphere), as Venus appeared as a small black dot floating across the surface of our Sun. This unique event, a phenomenon called the “transit of Venus,” had both Earth-bound observers as well as astronauts aboard the International Space Station transfixed. Following a solar eclipse protocol, viewers could not stare directly at the sun, donning protective glasses (solar eclipse glasses which, for future reference, can be purchased at a local museum or online), looking through telescopes outfitted with special filters (at observatories and museums at the aforementioned view parties), wearing welder’s glasses (number 14 or darker), looking through a homemade cardboard pinhole projector or watching online via NASA’s broadcast , Slooh.com or one...
Klimt - Black Feather Hat

Gustav Klimt, the Austrian Symbolist painter and one of the most prominent artists of the Vienna Secession movement, is being feted this year throughout the art world on a global scale in honor of his 150th birthday anniversary celebration.  Klimt, born July 14, 1862 (-February 6, 1918), is best known for his use of gold leaf and the sheer opalescence - and eroticism – of some of his works. From May 24 to August 27th, the Neue Gallerie in New York City joins other museums around the world to celebrate his extraordinary talent and legacy. In his birthplace of Vienna, Austria, museums including the Albertina, the Belevedre (which houses the most complete works of Klimt anywhere), the Leopold, the Wien, and the Kunsthistorisches are all focusing on and honoring varied aspects of Klimt's work. Klimt’s major works were vast: painting, murals, sketches, as well as other art objects were all part of Klimt’s vision. While nature played a part of his subjects (Tree of Life, and Apple Tree) with an emphasis on the deeper meaning behind these works, his primary – and favorite subject – was the female body. With the female body, Klimt envisioned goddesses:  sensual and statuesque.  Being a leader...
The Google Art Project

Yes. Google. The world’s #1 search engine.  Google. The same company who has been ensconced in a bitter battle with the publishing and author community over copyright. But Google has been doing something wonderful for the world community, bringing art, artists and museums to those who might have never been exposed to art before. And, even if they had, perhaps never have had (or ever will have) the opportunity to bring art collections and the museums in which they are housed delivered virtually to a user’s computer. For the project to work properly, not any browser will do.  Google’s own browser, Chrome, is the key to delving into the 3D virtual world, called Google Art Project. Many museums around the world are participants in this huge cultural undertaking. Over 100 international museums and galleries are participating in this project, among them, the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, the Fricke Collection in New York, the Cloisters in New York, the MOMA in New York, the Freer Gallery of Art at the Smithsonian in Washington DC, the Hungarian National Gallery, the Leopold Museum in Vienna, the Munch Museum in Oslo, the Musee de l’Orangerie in Paris,  Musee de Orsay in Paris, the Hermitage...
Hopper - Night Hawks, 1942

When one thinks of Edward Hopper, a slice of Americana comes to mind.  Urban and rural scenes, populated with people and landscapes from the coasts of Maine, Massachusetts and Connecticut in New England, to the urban landscapes of New York were his focus. Now, from June 12 – September 16, Edward Hopper unites Madrid, Spain and Paris, France – in Madrid. In Madrid’s Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza, a special collaborative project between the Museo and the Réunion des Musées Nationaux de France opens. (From Madrid, the exhibit will move to Paris for exhibition at the Grand Palais from October 10, 2012 – January 28, 2013).  The new exhibition called simply, Hopper, is perhaps one of the most important Hopper exhibitions outside of the United States. How so? The Museo in Madrid is home to the most important Hopper works outside of the United States.  And Paris’ role? A key touchpoint and a reference for Hopper as an artist. He loved Paris, moving there in 1906 and staying for nearly a year. So influential was Paris on Hopper, that he returned numerous times throughout his life. How important is this exhibition? It is the largest and most extensive exhibition of works by Hopper ever to...
Vincent van Gogh’s Mutant Sunflowers – A Botanical Experiment

The word “mutant” conjures images of superheroes, space aliens and strange creatures. But sunflowers? Yes. Vincent van Gogh’s obsession with sunflowers gripped him throughout his career. His 1888-1889 Sunflower Series is perhaps some of his most recognized and vibrant work. But the swirling, almost surrealistic portrayal of sunflowers weren’t a symptom of van Gogh’s mental illness. His “teddy bear” sunflowers were – are – genetic mutants, so say scientists.  And they’ve solved the mystery by cross-breeding different types of sunflowers and mapping their genetics. According to plant biologist John Burke at the University of Georgia, “Sunflowers as a whole family, is the largest and most successful plant family on Earth.  There’s a lot of floral variation going on, largely due to change in symmetry. We think the genes controlling this symmetry could play an extremely important role in their success.” Burke co-authored a study of sunflowers published online in PLoS Genetics. Sunflowers are not single flowers. Instead, they are clusters of hundreds of florets that vary, growing in two types: ray florets (petal-like flowers that edge the sunflower’s head and don’t develop seeds) and disc florets (tube-like flowers which grow seeds, filling the centers of the sunflower). But other florets are numerous, as...

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