Art genre and styles

Art genre and styles
Learn about Art genera and painting styles and subjects. Take a glimpse into the past and learn about the great art movements of old and their effects on the world of fashion and beauty.
Rembrandt - Artist in His Studio

Rembrandt Harmenszoon van Rijn was born in Leiden - the Netherlands - on July 15th, 1606. He was the youngest of 9 children and a premature artist whose genius placed in History. At 14 he was already enrolled at the University of Leiden. However, the program was not fit to his passion, as he requested to leave shortly after to be taught in Art. He learned with master Jacob van Swanenburch for 3 years and then moved for a three month apprenticeship in Amsterdam with the great Pieter Lastman. Before turning 22 his talent was so highly regarded that he took his first pupils under his wing. Throughout his life he taught over 40 artists, including Gerard Dou, Ferdinand Bol and Govert Flinck.His career as a painter had great leverage after he married Saskia van Uylenburgh in 1634, the cousin of a successful art dealer. Soon his work gained reputation among wealthy patrons who commissioned his portraits – lively and vibrant unlike the ones by other portrait artists - as well as large-scale mythological and religious works with a distinctive high-contrast method.Rembrandt managed to be financially successful during his lifetime - as a painter, a teacher and art dealer....

The dark night had fallen over Bethulia. A (symbolic) place in Jerusalem about to be taken and destroyed under the orders of Nebuchadnezzar, the king of Assyria. General Holofernes had been dispatched to take vengeance of all the western nations who would refuse to worship the king alone, occupying all the territory along the seacoast. Bethulia would be next. News had come to Judith, a virtuous widow who was as brave as beautiful. On that night, Judith left the city surrounded by the enemy's army and finds her way into Halofernes camp, where a banquet was taking place. As she finds the man who desired her, she attracted him to his tent, seduced him, served him wine to the point of weakness and decapitated him with his own sword. This is the biblical story of The Book of Judith, the woman who set her people free and inspired at least a hundred and forty one works of art - from Donatello and Botticelli to Rembrandt, Goya and Caravaggio.Gustav Klimt - the Austrian symbolist son of a bohemian gold engraver - had his first take on Judith's theme in 1901. It was also the opening work of his “golden period”...
Mackintosh - Design for a Wall Decoration

Charles Rennie Mackintosh, was a Scottish post impressionist artist that became one of the most exciting architects from the XX's century and one of the world's greatest designers. He was the fourth of 11 children, born in Glasgow on 7th July 1868. By the age of 16 he started to work at the Honeyman and Keppie architectural practice while attending evening classes at the Glasgow School of Arts, and by the age of 22 he won the Alexander Thomson Travelling Studentship for the study of ancient classic architecture.Upon his return home he met fellow artist Margaret MacDonald who became his wife in 1900, and the love for all his life. By that time he also had a professional identity strongly formed, assuming himself as an artist architect who questioned the traditional values. For Mackintosh, buildings – such as art - should provide a form of enlightenment, celebrate joy in nature, the grace of form and colour, matching functional with spiritual. It was absurd to see modern churches, theaters and banks made in imitation of Greek temples so he brought to life the 'Glasgow Style': Scottish traditions combined with several architectural styles and a hint of Japanese influence, which stunning...

"La Nascita di Venere", the classical myth, is an iconic highlight of Italian Renaissance. The moment when the Goddess of Love emerges from the unknown depths of the sea, in bright striking colors, bringing spiritual beauty to the world as a driving force of life.At the time of its creation, during the Middle Ages, most depictions of women symbolized Virgin Mary in a maternal, modest pose, with covered head and angelic smile. Botticelli dares to bring to life a beautiful goddess in voluptuous proportions, with long blonde hair caressed by Winds and surrounded by flowers. This shy, pale skinned creature, was depicted in a groundbreaking 6ft by 9ft canvas being the first large-scale painting and one of the first non-biblical female nudes in Italian art. It took 3 years to be completed, between 1482 and 1485, being today one of the landmarks of the Neo-Platonic thought.This was also the time when Humanism was taking attention off the Roman Catholic influence, and the Italians were seeking to recapture the mythological glory of Rome under the threat of The Inquisition. The Birth of Venus - the daring nude, the rebirth of the pagan theme - had all the elements to be burnt by...

The Last Supper is a solemn memorial of the moment when Jesus prepared his disciples for his departure. The most known pieces include artists as Duccio (1308-11), Fra Angelico (1440-41), Andrea del Castagno (1447), Domenico Ghirlandaio (1480), Hans Holbein (1524/5), Il Tintoretto (1594), Valentin de Boulogne (1625/6) and Peter Paul Rubens (1632). Our favourite examples are the work of Leonardo da Vinci considered the first of High Renaissance art due to its high level of harmony; and the one of Vicente Juan Macip, the Spanish artist known as Juan de Juanes whose approach was also rare for his time.Leonardo da Vinci took three years to complete 'Il Cenacolo', in 1498. Sixty-four years later, in 1562, Juan de Juanes makes his own impression of 'La Ultima Cena'.  Whilst one focuses in a dramatic depiction of Jesus' announcement of his betrayal (Gospel of John); the other focuses the moment when Jesus distributed the bread and wine – his flesh and blood – as a way to be remembered after his condemnation (Matthew). Both are beautiful masterpieces that deserve a place in our minds and - why not - in our house.DA VINCI"Truly, truly, I say to you, one of you will...
ALTERNATIVE STREET ART IN ALL SHAPES AND FORMS

Art in the street is enlightening, it breaks the dormancy of routine. It exists for free, stating the existence of it self and from all around it. Art cannot be constrained to galleries. It needs to be in the street, happening to people. Transforming their eyes, their vision, so they can become – in their own way – artists too. Street art comes out of this surprise box that is the world, not to say 'I am here' but to tell 'you are here' too. Here are some examples of happenings bringing streets to life.THE AWAKENING OF LIGHTThe French artist Clement Briend creates light projections onto buildings and nature, blending in the same space two different realities. It is the projection of an idea without extracting the nature of the object upon he projects, creating this multi-dimensional feeling into his installations. "Cambodian Trees" is a great example of this effect, achieved by digitally project sculptural representations of deities and spirits overlaid on trees. It works out as a beautiful surprise, as the figures reveal themselves at night, taking the shape of nature, as if the gods have just awakened.RAINBOW OF SHADOWSIn a hot summer, where shadows give comfort and...

Primitivism is a "term used with reference to art that celebrates certain values or forms regarded as primal, ancestral, fertile and regenerative," according to Rodger Cardinal (Oxford University Press, 2009). At one time the term was representative of Africa, Asia, Pre-Colombian America, and the Pacific Islands. Though between 1905-1935 western artists began flocking to this subject matter and the term found its spectrum widening; this interest in "ethnic arts" by westerners was in a large part due to the formal studies in anthropology and by art historians. It seemed to be the closest that some artists would get to such raw material as supposedly represented within its own unbiased, cultural context. Though, it seems the artists were drawn to the inspiration for primarily formal reasons.One such artist is Henri Rousseau, a post-impressionist painter widely recognized for his work in Primitivism. He was born in the Loire Valley of France and worked as a tax collector; he was a self-taught artist. He never left France but many scenes of his works took place in the jungle. Other artists that explored Primitivism included Matisse, Picasso, and Gauguin. Though, Gauguin did travel to Tahiti but took up with a French colony there. Picasso,...
Francisco Goya Paintings

A look at the life of Francisco Goya from his play on light, political challenges, to his disturbing Black Paintings in later years.
Waterhouse - Miranda - The Tempest

John William Waterhouse (born between January and April 1849, died February 10, 1917) was an English painter known mainly for his Pre-Raphaelite painting style. The artist drew inspiration from Romantic and Classical disciplines, as he combined these genres over his lifetime to create beautiful and enduring works of art.Born in Rome, Italy to English parents, Waterhouse moved back to England and studied at the Royal Academy of Arts where he attained early success through yearly exhibitions at such distinguished platforms as the Royal Academy Summer Exhibition and Society of British Artists.While his contemporaries were studying Impressionism in the late nineteenth century, Waterhouse embraced the Pre-Raphaelite method; a style which sought to connect art with poetry and literature, and express genuine ideas as they relate to nature.Waterhouse developed his own canon of technique which is evident within most of his work. He drew upon tragic and beautiful literary figures with a special affection for the femme fatal. Waterhouse represents his chosen allegories and gives further narrative to those themes through symbolism, color, and realism. These benchmarks include dramatic color for strong women, softer shades for more romantic sentiment, and the illusion of movement in his paintings.Elected to the...
The Young Sailor, Henri Matisse

Fauvism art had its beginning at the turn of the twentieth century as a break from Impressionism. In 1905, Henri Matisse painted a series of works while staying in the small fishing port of Collioure along the Mediterranean with artist Andre Derain. The colors were vibrant and unmixed. These works showed at the Salon d'Automne in Paris (1905), where art critic Louis Vauxcelles called the works "wild beasts" or fauvs, a term which would later be applied to artists who painted in this style.After having applied the techniques of Post-Impressionism (Think Van Gogh or Gauguin) and Neo-Impressionism (Think Signac or Seurat), Henri Matisse avoided rendering three-dimensional space and focused instead on color planes. This can be seen in his work The Young Sailor I (1906), a portrait of then eighteen-year-old sailor Germain Augustin Barthélémy Montargès. Matisse adds a bit of theatrics and wit to the sailor's expression.This theatrical addition to the model's expression becomes a component of  the renderings of Fauvism artists.  The aspect of emotionalism led some Fauvism artists to work in the style of Cubism, an art movement focusing more in the logical organization of geometric shapes, often abstracted in a puzzle-like manner. Though the art movement was not prevalent among...