Tags Posts tagged with "Impressionism"

Tag: Impressionism

Amaretto by Alexey Rubinov

Alexey Rubanov is a Ukrainian artist whose work has been exhibited internationally. Hailing originally from Zaporozhye, he’s lived in the town of Kremenchug for the past 15 years. Born in the early 70’s, Rubanov recalls being an artist for as long as he can remember. Finding the musicality in painting, the painter sees sound as color in his works. The contemporary collection of works that Rubanov creates is unique to the artist, coming together in his own school of painting. Covering his canvases with oil and acrylics, he explores and experiments with his own artistic voice and the use of color. Even though Rubanov has always seen himself as an artist, he honed his skills while earning a master’s degree from the Kharkov State Artistic School and Poltava National University. His first exhibits were in the artist’s native country of the Ukraine. His works have been shown around the world, including St. Petersburg and Kiev. His artwork was most recently shown at the 6th Beijing International Art Biennale in 2015. Rubanov is also part of the National Artists of Ukraine and Art for Peace. Along with exhibiting extensively both in the Ukraine and internationally, the artist won first prize in the All-Ukrainian...
Le Havre

You can’t get something for nothing. Or can you? In the case of art gallery director Jonathan Greene, you absolutely can! When Green bought two early pastel studies by Claude Monet he had no clue that there was a third artwork hidden behind the others. The director of London’s Richard Green Gallery bought the Monet’s at a Paris auction in 2014 for an undisclosed amount. After returning home, Green realized that he had three (not just two) original Monet’s. The surprise artwork was taped to the back of one of Green’s purchases. The first two artworks are studies of skies, dating from 1868. The pieces are from an early period in the artist’s career and depict Monet’s fascination with the changes of the natural world. The exploration of light and the natural transitions in the sky were treasure enough when it came to the two Monet pastels. The third work features the jetty and lighthouse at Le Havre in Normandy. The artist used a blue-tinted paper to accompany the sea-side scene that features the area where he grew up (and the subject of his first professional painting created when he was only 18). All three pieces are rare and were not originally...

The Impressionist Claude Monet’s painting “Bassin aux nympheas, les rosiers” sold recently for a lofty $20.4 million. Wang Jianlin, Asia’s richest man, bought the artwork at Sotheby’s May 5 Impressionist and Modern Art sale. Bought by the collector’s Dalian Wanda Group, the Chinese company has been buying Western artworks recently. In the past few years the Dalian Wanda Group has bought other notable works, such as Pablo Picasso’s “Claude et Paloma.” With an auction total of $368.3 million, Asian collectors contributed to more than 30 percent of the sales. The auction was the second-highest sale for Sotheby’s, taking next-to-best after the 2014 New York $422.1 million sale. Private collectors from Asia bought three out of the auction’s top five lots. Each of the top sales was over $20 million. “Bassin aux nympheas, les rosiers” wasn’t the only Monet to sell at the evening’s auction. The lots also included four other works by the artist; bringing in a total of $115.4 million. This includes a $54 million sale to an American collector. This makes the to-date total for Monet’s in 2015 $199.2 million, already topping last year’s sales total for the impressionist artist of $190.5 million. The auction high for the night was...
DANCING IN RED by Anthony Dunphy

A native of Newfoundland, Anthony Dunphy has a Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Education from Memorial University in Canada. Dunphy was born in Carbonear, grew up in the capital city of St. John’s and resides in Japan. Making the city of Numazu home, Dunphy now lives in Shizuoka prefecture at the base of Mount Fuji. Inspired by his father to become an artist, Dunphy has been working as a professional painter since 2006. Along with his father (who carved in soapstone, sketched, drew and used mixed media -- but never showed his art publicly), Dunphy also gained inspiration from the nostalgic Norman Rockwell covers of the Saturday Evening Post. Dunphy primarily paints in professional grade acrylics. This provides him with the perfect vehicle to create his vividly-hued works. He also occasionally uses graphite to create drawings. His art was first shown in the Grand Hall at Grand Central Station in New York City. Following this, Dunphy was featured in exhibitions at Toyota Motors Corporation as well as at local Japanese events. The artist captures seemingly everyday moments in light-drenched hues, bringing the images off of the canvas with pops of bold colors. His “Telling Sea Stories” depicts a seashore scene, showing...

Taking the train to Giverny, home of Claude Monet, just became even more fun. The SNCF rail network recently launched the “Impressionist train.” This upgrade to the traditional train cars makes the rail ride into Normandy a true artistic experience. Visiting the famous home of one of (if not the) most notable Impressionist artists is less than an hour trip from Paris by train. The newest edition to the Rouen line features an art theme that adds to the overall experience. Before ever stepping foot on the historic ground where Monet once painted masterworks such as Water Lilies, visitors are treated to a preview of what's to come. Previously, the railway network offered dressed-up service to Versailles. Instead of the typical neutral train décor, the Versailles carriers feature pictures of the famed chateau. The Giverny rail will be SNCF’s summer-time venture into the art world. The car interiors feature reproductions of some of Monet's most famous works, along with the art of his fellow Impressionist painters. Themes for the cars include local landscapes, gardens and water and Paris and industrialism. Additional photos from the Musee d’Orsay’s architecture also adorn the insides of the train cars. Upon arrival at Vernon, riders will...
INVENTING IMPRESSIONISM

Way back in the 1870s a group of young artists were breaking from the traditional realist style and snubbing the academy (literally). Now-famous painters such as Monet, Renoir, Sisley and Pissarro were on the cusp of creating something monumental that would eventually change the landscape of the art world. While contemporary critics and art lovers alike are well-versed in all that is the Impressionists, their style and the artists who created the light-drenched paintings, the same can't be said of their the 19th century counterparts. Harkening back to a time when the world was first discovering the Impressionists, the British National Gallery's "Inventing Impressionism" is a show that takes the viewer to the 1800s and rise of a new style. Paul Durand-Ruel’s name may not be as well-known as Monet's or Renoir's. That said, in the art world this entrepreneur is a pivotal figure. "Inventing Impressionism" features 85 works that (except for one piece) have at one point or another been connected to the art dealer. The exhibit itself follows the beginning and rise of the Impressionist movement, tracing Durand-Ruel's role in the eventual fame that the style achieved. Key points in the art dealer’s life and career are shown...
Manet Paints Monet

Travel back in time to the summer of 1874, as art history is made in Willibald Sauerlander's Manet Paints Monet: A Summer in Argenteuil. Sauerlander's narrative details the growing friendship of the two famed Impressionist painters along with the transcendence of a new style. Sauerlander himself 'paints a picture' of the two artists, their summer together and how they influenced the art world through their masterful works. Edouard Manet and Claude Monet spent the summer of 1874 roaming through Argenteuil together, building a friendship on the banks (and waters) of the Seine River. While, to the modern day art enthusiast, Impressionism seems like a staple in the art world, in the late 1800’s this was not the case. Monet and Manet were independent thinkers who were, in the summer of 1874, in the midst of creating a new style that was decidedly different from the more traditional artists of the Academie Des Beaux-Arts. Rejecting established styles, Monet sought to depict modern life in pure colors, with loose brushwork and a focus on the natural environment. Manet Paints Monet features the story of two artists, two friends and two visionaries working together. Choosing a boat as the backdrop to the portrait, Manet was...
INTERESTING BOOK by Roman Fedosenko

Hailing from Minsk, Belarus, Roman Fedosenko is an international artist who paints in both Impressionist and Realist styles. Starting his career in design, Fedosenko has also worked in castings and ceramics. He went on to work in different styles, exploring multiple genres of painting. The artist’s light-drenched works are bright, bold and often action-oriented. Fedosenko currently works in oils on canvas. Featured subjects include motorcycles, portraits, land and sea- scapes. The artist also captures the Impressionist style within a traditional-seeming subject matter, featuring flowing ballerinas moving on the stage. He mixes a realist edge with the texture-filled brushstrokes of the great Impressionist painters. Fedosenko’s works capture both an old-world and modern day feel together, while bringing warmth to the canvas through the subtle play of light and shadows. Working directly with clients and exhibiting in galleries has inspired Fedosenko’s art to grow and evolve. He chose to join the online artists’ community of ArtistBe.com in order to help the public learn about his work. While his work may resemble the Impressionist style of master painters, Fedosenko did not study his craft at art school. He is self-taught when it comes to painting, studying by himself. Fedosenko’s paintings don’t follow a singular theme,...

Redecorating a home can be challenging and picking out a new color scheme may seem like the most daunting part of the process. Reds, blues and greens are all viable options, but which shade? What about the trim? Then begins the frenzy of online searches, torn out pages from magazines, and stealthily analyzing the homes of friends and family for inspiration. After the headache of choosing colors and painting the walls, another challenge arises: What to decorate the walls with? Let's start with that question. Choose a work of art to inspire your color scheme and forget the online searches for “wall colors ideas.” When you go to peruse the paint chips in the home depot store, you will be prepared. Here are three examples from the reproduction art galleries of Overstock Art to inspire you as you choose home wall colors. Click on the hyperlink art titles to have the ability to zoom on each painting as if it were inches from your eye. Klimt's The Kiss Gustav Klimt's The Kiss (1907-08) is an iconic painting of two lovers sharing a romantic kiss among a bed of flowers. Which colors appear the most vibrant to you? Where is your eye immediately drawn...

Did you know there was an Italian Proto-Impressionism? The Macchiaoli movement was active in Florence during the mid-nineteenth century. A few disenchanted, youthful men were fed up with the "Neoclassical" movement and met at Caffe Michelangiolo with other creatives to discuss politics and the rebirth of a type of art to encompass the chiaroscuro of Caravaggio and the whimsical realism of Rembrandt. Macchia translates to “stain,” inspiring the name for the Macchiaoli art movement. Macchiaoli (1855-1862) preceded Impressionism by a difference of about ten years, and the movements have quite a few things in common historically. When paired side by side the similarities are significant enough for any art enthusiast to raise a questioning eyebrow. A few of these strange similarities include: The formation of each movement was in opposition to a "Neoclassical" and and politically-correct school with a very strict definition of art. The Impressionists made their own outdoor gallery to show their works in the early 1870's by the  Académie des Beaux-Arts. The Macchiaoli painters were noted to be very anti-academy. The name of each movement was coined by a critic in a review with similar meanings and intended disdain. For Impressionism: The paintings were incomplete child's play, and the...

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